Selling Yarns 2

Innovation for sustainability

 

Papers

Craft for the other 10%: Ethical steps towards a sustainable world craft

Session: Policies for sustainability Saturday 7 March 2009 11:20 - 12:40 pm

Kevin Murray

Writer and Curator,

Abstract

As we saw a 'linguistic turn' transform humanities in the late 20th century, on our side of the millennium it seems that we are witnessing a wave of cultural accountability - an 'ethical turn'.

Culture is no longer 'innocent' of politics. An artist cannot draw inspiration from the third world without accounting for his or her economic privileges. Similarly in disciplines such as anthropology and archaeology it is an expectation that the researcher works in partnership with the community - the knowledge which they glean must be paid for, usually in services.

This ethical turn may seem rather negative. Guilt can lead towards greater distance between cultures, as those from rich countries are hesitant to be seen as cultural predators. But there are positive developments too.

The existence of a just partnership between rich and poor is a valuable ideal, and increasingly we seem willing to pay for it. Fair Trade sales in commodities such as chocolate and coffee have risen greatly, up to 50% a year. Given the modest nature of these purchases, it is unlikely that they will be affected by the economic downturn.

Previously, it was the 'customer is always right'. But now the interests of the producer have become relevant. There is a multitude of products that advertise their benefits to the community of origin, including bottled water, textiles, furniture, cosmetics and medicines. As this trend continues the build, it naturally becomes commodified. We cringe to learn that McDonalds is now a member of the Rainbow Alliance. What guarantee do we have that such associations are more than marketing gimmicks, there to enhance the primary brand? As Nestle, Coca-Cola and other global brands jump on the ethical bandwagon, we are tempted to become cynical about the whole ethical turn. How can we tell the difference between substance and advertising?

At this point, it seems important that those designing these products find a way of sustaining the trust of the consumer. The challenge is to provide the consumer with convincing information about the arrangement with the producing community. It's hard to convey this information just as dry facts, there needs to be a compelling narrative about the challenges faced by the community and their current aspirations.

This is partly a design challenge. How do you develop products that 'feel good'? How might the consumer feel that his or her purchase not only promises them goodness, but in a small way makes the world a better place? This product might be the exception. This product may not be drawing on an unsustainable resource, subjecting displaced peoples to sweatshop conditions or exporting industrial pollution from first to third worlds.

So we need to find a way of designing ethical value that will last. It's not good enough to make ethics fashionable. Today's trend is tomorrow's dumpster. And it's not enough to be dewy-eyed. Today's romantic myth is tomorrow's cranky disillusionment.

The project of a Code of Practice for Craft-Design Collaborations is designed to strengthen this ethical turn in product development. The initial phase is to open this question up for discussion in a way where no view is excluded, from the most idealistic to the most cynical. It is this openness that will serve to help develop an enduring understanding of the nature of an object's ethical value.

See also: Kevin Murray's biography